August 30, 2014
There’s a secret Cold War bunker hidden inside the Brooklyn Bridge
amhider, roadtrippers.com
Thousands of people each day cross the Brooklyn Bridge , and almost all of them have no clue as to what’s hidden inside the massive structure— let alone that the bridge is full of secret passageways and forgotten rooms. Inside one of the giant st…

There’s a secret Cold War bunker hidden inside the Brooklyn Bridge
amhider, roadtrippers.com

Thousands of people each day cross the Brooklyn Bridge , and almost all of them have no clue as to what’s hidden inside the massive structure— let alone that the bridge is full of secret passageways and forgotten rooms. Inside one of the giant st…

August 28, 2014
How An Emmy Statuette Is Made
JOHN BROWNLEE, fastcodesign.com
For the past 66 years, an Emmy Statuette has been made in the exact same way.Last year, the organization behind the Emmys gave the brand a facelift. But the Emmy statuette itself? Like the Oscar, it’s meant to be timeless. The manufacturing…

How An Emmy Statuette Is Made
JOHN BROWNLEE, fastcodesign.com

For the past 66 years, an Emmy Statuette has been made in the exact same way.

Last year, the organization behind the Emmys gave the brand a facelift. But the Emmy statuette itself? Like the Oscar, it’s meant to be timeless. The manufacturing…

August 28, 2014
Historic Rotary Snowplow Cuts a Path in the Snow for Trains
Sara Barnes, mymodernmet.com
While it’s still summer for many of us, we can’t help but think about the upcoming cooler temperatures. This historic and impressive piece of machinery is the rotary snowplow, and it’s used for clearing train tracks after a heavy snowfall. The lar…

Historic Rotary Snowplow Cuts a Path in the Snow for Trains
Sara Barnes, mymodernmet.com

While it’s still summer for many of us, we can’t help but think about the upcoming cooler temperatures. This historic and impressive piece of machinery is the rotary snowplow, and it’s used for clearing train tracks after a heavy snowfall. The lar…

August 24, 2014
cyclocosm:

@iamtedking photo on the @nbcsncycling van. I guess he was hungry that day. #prochallenge

cyclocosm:

@iamtedking photo on the @nbcsncycling van. I guess he was hungry that day. #prochallenge

August 23, 2014
How to Read a Cheese Wheel

How to Read a Cheese Wheel

August 22, 2014
Clever Trick Makes Physical Lego Calendar Sync to Online Calendarcore77.com
We gave you a brief look at this awesome Lego Calendar project earlier in the year, but this is worth a closer look. The UK-based design studio formerly known as Vitamins (now called Special Projects) devised a physical calendar for their studio m…

Clever Trick Makes Physical Lego Calendar Sync to Online Calendar
core77.com

We gave you a brief look at this awesome Lego Calendar project earlier in the year, but this is worth a closer look. The UK-based design studio formerly known as Vitamins (now called Special Projects) devised a physical calendar for their studio m…

August 22, 2014
fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

August 20, 2014
mapsontheweb:

Worst hurricanes on the US East Coast

mapsontheweb:

Worst hurricanes on the US East Coast

(Source: xkcd.org)

August 19, 2014
The Insanely Lucrative Uniforms Of Soccer
MARK WILSON, fastcodesign.com
You’re looking at hundreds of millions of dollars in sweat-soaked logos.As the Premier League gets ready to kick off another season of soccer—Americans might understand it as the NFL of England—ESPN is exploring the economics of the uniforms…

The Insanely Lucrative Uniforms Of Soccer
MARK WILSON, fastcodesign.com

You’re looking at hundreds of millions of dollars in sweat-soaked logos.

As the Premier League gets ready to kick off another season of soccer—Americans might understand it as the NFL of England—ESPN is exploring the economics of the uniforms…

August 12, 2014
» A journalist recalls covering the Centennial Olympic Park bombing for the New York Times JIMROMENESKO.COM

» ‘Legs for bomb’

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